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Starting a data quality journey - part three

First published on LinkedIn, June 20, 2016

In my previous post, I promised an overview of the elements which make up a structured data quality programme. The first element to cover is your positioning of the programme.

 

This needs to take account of the fact that your role is to deliver what the business wants. How you get there is of interest to you, but likely not to everyone else.

In my previous post, I promised an overview of the elements which make up a structured data quality programme. The first element to cover is your positioning of the programme.

This needs to take account of the fact that your role is to deliver what the business wants. How you get there is of interest to you, but likely not to everyone else.

All that is thought should not be said;

all that is said should not be written;
all that is written should not be published;
and all that is published should not be read.

Rabbi Menachem Mendel Of Kotzk (1787–1859)

In May 2016, Instagram revealed its new app icon. In an age of rapid development and deployment, this seemingly simple change of visual took nine months to come up with. They were so proud, that they even made a video about it.

Think about it, Instagram grows by more than eighty million images per day; yet one image took three quarters of a year!

There is good reason for this.  The app icon is deeply important to the business, and required a lot of thought and effort. 

Who cares?  Instagram may have gone through a deep and meaningful journey to get there, but as a user, all I care about is that the service allows me to interact with people’s images in the best possible way.

This is a lesson for all of us. 
 

A structured data quality programme is made of many ingredients, carefully selected and brought together in a way that is suitable for the organisation.  The outputs are insightful and valuable, and possibly even beautiful.


Recall from the earlier two posts about why we are doing data governance and quality:

  • To make decisions based on data of sufficient quality
  • To do so in a way which is not just reactive, and not relying on best endeavours

Our aim then, is:
to have a proactive and structured approach
  which will give the organisation data of sufficient quality
  in order to make good decisions.


Don’t sell data governance, sell good decision making.

Until next time,
Charles

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